This Month’s Pool Maintenance FAQ’s

Pool maintenance is a complex subject, and understandably, pool owners have a lot of questions! Here are a few more frequently asked questions answered: Q: I've seen safety codes posted at public pools. Are there similar codes for my private pool? A: Yes! The most important aspects of pool maintenance is safety. Community pools will…

Pool maintenance is a complex subject, and understandably, pool owners have a lot of questions! Here are a few more frequently asked questions answered:

Q: I've seen safety codes posted at public pools. Are there similar codes for my private pool?

A: Yes! The most important aspects of pool maintenance is safety. Community pools will have different standards relating aspects such as lifeguards and the number of people they can have in the pool at one time. However, all pools are required to exist to certain drain cover standards because the powerful suction that drains create is a drowning risk. For other safety laws, you should check with your state. Certain states, especially warm-weather areas such as California and Florida, have passed specific regulation regarding safety covers, gates, and door and window locks. All pool owners, however, should adhere to safety basics regardless of whether the law requires them to. Always supervise children, both inside the pool and inside the house, in order to ensure nothing happens when you are not looking. There are lots of pool supplies available to give you a piece of mind-covers, gates, alarms, and other supplies.

Q: I'm having trouble removing pesky tile stains and water lines from my pool. What can I do to get rid of them?

A: Stains can be attacked two ways: brushing and chemicals. Weekly brushing can improve the look of stains and some pool owners find that using a pumice stone works well for them. As far as swimming pool supplies go, rust and scale remover or tile and vinyl cleaner can help remove the look of stains and prevent buildup from forming in the first place. You should monitor your calcium buildup a bit closer so that you can adjust accordingly and prevent calcium buildup from forming.

Q: My pets like to swim in the pool. Is this OK?

A: It's not uncommon for pets to want to join in on the fun! However, this can be harmful for both your pet and your pool. The contaminants that your dog brings in to the pool can upset your water chemistry. Also, pets can have more sensitive skin than we humans have, so pool chemicals can dry and irritate their skin. If you think it's really important for your dog to be able to take a dip with you, consult a pool maintenance technician about keeping your water chemistry at a level that will not bother your pet's skin as much. This can vary depending on your pool's size and chemical needs.